archaicwonder:

Greek Gold Wreath, 2nd century BC
This wreath was purportedly recovered in modern day China, in a region which saw tremendous cross-cultural contact exchange due to the trade routes of the famed Silk Road.
Wreaths worn as a crown are among the more recognizable symbols of ancient Greek and Roman civilizations. Awarded for various accomplishments, or simply as symbols of status and rank, wreaths might be made from the leaves of such plants as olive, ivy, oak, myrtle or laurel. The laurel wreath, awarded to victorious athletes and for academic achievement, is perhaps the best known of the wreath crowns. The example seen here, however, depicts artistic variations on a mix of species including the trumpet vine.
Wreaths of mixed foliage, particularly fashioned in precious metal, are believed to have been made as funerary objects or as offerings at temples. The conquests of Alexander the Great, and the later expansion of the Roman Empire resulted in the appearance of such items far beyond the boundaries of modern Greece and Italy.

archaicwonder:

Greek Gold Wreath, 2nd century BC

This wreath was purportedly recovered in modern day China, in a region which saw tremendous cross-cultural contact exchange due to the trade routes of the famed Silk Road.

Wreaths worn as a crown are among the more recognizable symbols of ancient Greek and Roman civilizations. Awarded for various accomplishments, or simply as symbols of status and rank, wreaths might be made from the leaves of such plants as olive, ivy, oak, myrtle or laurel. The laurel wreath, awarded to victorious athletes and for academic achievement, is perhaps the best known of the wreath crowns. The example seen here, however, depicts artistic variations on a mix of species including the trumpet vine.

Wreaths of mixed foliage, particularly fashioned in precious metal, are believed to have been made as funerary objects or as offerings at temples. The conquests of Alexander the Great, and the later expansion of the Roman Empire resulted in the appearance of such items far beyond the boundaries of modern Greece and Italy.

Aπόλλων
One of my favourite Greco-Roman gods!

Aπόλλων

One of my favourite Greco-Roman gods!

I’m back from my holiday in Rome and thought I’d share a couple of sketches from my trip :-D

I’m back from my holiday in Rome and thought I’d share a couple of sketches from my trip :-D

A message from sannachan
Uni is very different from what you are used to, indeed, but I think you are gonna do amazing, cause you get to study what you love and that doesn't happen to a lot of people! Good luck and keep us updated :33

Even though it does seem overwhelming and scary, I’m still becoming happier/more curious (and more impatient to begin studying) every day! And yes, I really do like the idea of being able to study what I love - I can’t wait to learn more about ancient Egypt :3 Thanks a lot for your sweet comment! :3 And don’t worry, I’ll keep you updated! ;-) :3

A message from sandrosanio
I'm so happy and glad that you'll study Egyptology!!!!! Wish you all the luck although you won't need any because you love ancient Egypt so you know a lot about that subject! :) Again, congrats! :)

Thank you!!! :-D Yeah, I really look forward to, you know, being able to do something “serious” with my interest and love for ancient Egypt :-D Thanks for the nice words - I really need them right now, ‘cause even though I’m extremely excited about the whole Egyptology thing, I’m also terrified beyond believe! University sounds so serious and confusing!! XD Your comment really cheered me up! :3

A Dream Come True

So my holiday in Marseilles has been really great so far and it just got one hell of a lot better because of this e-mail:

I know it’s all gibberish to most of you, because it’s in Danish, so let me explain: This is an e-mail I’ve recieved from the University of Copenhagen and it says that my application has been accepted and that I’m going to study Egyptology from the first of September!!!!

This is truely a dream come true for me - I’ve wanted to study Egyptoogy for as long as I can remember and it’s so amazing and actually almost kind of “surreal” that it’s really happening now!!!

I’ll probably be listening to this for the rest of my holiday!!!

A message from groove-on-boogie-down
Beautiful beautiful art work!!

Awww :3

I’m off on holiday for the next couple of weeks, so I’ll just apoligize in advance for my inactivity and apparent death ;-)

I’ll be spending two weeks in Marseilles with my parents and my sister and then I’ll be in Rome for a week with my boyfriend and two of our friends :3

I’m so excited! :-D

image

A message from Anonymous
Your art is always fantastic, I absolutely love it!

Thank you so much, Anon! :-D

The Prince and the Flower Girl

The Prince and the Flower Girl

A message from Anonymous
Do you have any recs for fiction novels about Ancient Egypt?

Hmm … It depends a lot on what you’re looking for :-) I’ve just begun to read “Mara - Daugther of the Nile” by Eloise Jarvis McGraw (got an anon rec a couple of weeks ago) and I actually like it very much :-) Another anon told me to read the “Lord Meren Mysteries” by  Lynda S. Robinson (I haven’t had time to read those books yet, but they sound pretty good too) :-)

You could also try reading “The Mummy” by Anne Rice (it’s not one of the most thrilling books ever written, but it’s still a pretty good read) or “Cleopatra’s Daughter” by Michelle Moran :-) Perhaps you should also take a look at Stacy Schiff’s “Cleopatra” (although it isn’t exactly fiction, it’s still written in a very interesting and sort of “vivid” way, so you almost forget that you’re reading a non-fiction book) :-)

A message from Anonymous
Would you please stop drawing things from the kemetic culture? Its kinda offensive stick to your own history and culture

So, let me get this right: You think my ancient Egypt related drawings are offensive because of the fact that I’m Danish/white? Are you serious?

I mean, I could sort of understand your point, if my drawings actually were offensive, but I don’t really think they are. I love ancient Egypt. I think it’s an absolutely amazing culture and a culture which I try to embrace with the utmost respect!

What you’re saying is that I’m not allowed to find joy and inspiration in another culture because of the country I live in. I’m not allowed to educate myself about the history of the human race, beacuse I don’t happen to live in a certain place or look like a certain group of people.

What you’re saying is that I’m only allowed to draw things such as vikings or Danish kings/queens - no wait, I’m not even allowed to draw that, because many Danish kings and queens actually came from Germany and German was the official language at Court throughout the 17th and 18th century.

I’m so glad that only a few people think like you do. Otherwise we would live in a very, very boring, depressing and downright cruel world, where no one would be interested in anything that didn’t come from their own country and where people would fight and hate each other even more than they already do.

A message from beau-diddly
Your art makes me so happy! I love your style and you use the water colours so well its great :3 (sorry for the weird message ha ha...)

Awww that’s so sweet of you! Thanks a lot! :3 I’ve just got home from a really busy day at work and I was SO done with the world and all people in it until I saw your message - you’ve totally saved my evening! :-D

image

A message from pharaohspacship
you painted that picture of the woman looking up into the stars?

If you’re referring to this drawing, then yes I did :-)