A message from plintoon-reblogs
Dude, your watercolours are gorgeous.

Thanks!! :D :D

plintoon-reblogs:


wardens-oath:


I’m not disputing the Egyptians weren’t white. But unless you can provide me with evidence that they were “pitched black”, then I’m gonna seriously question this post.
For example, this mummy portrait, although being highly Romanised, does not show a black man. It dates from AD100. 
Or, you knnow, we have Nefertiti’s bust. She dates from the Amarna period, Dynasty 18, around the same time as Tutankhamun.
I’m not calling bullshit, I’m just calling this into question.
Also, Ancient Egypt was a mixed society, or did you never learn about The Libyan or Hyksos invasions?

In my grade ten History class we learned that in the North the people were significantly lighter colour than in the south. Making my believe those in the North were probably much more “Arab” looking while the south, since it was closer to Nubia looked like what we consider, “African”.
Also King Tut would’ve had lighter dark skin as did the women in Egypt because they wouldn’t have been working outside in the sun, unlike peasants.

I don’t normally get involved in stuff like this but *cracks knuckles* lets do some research.
The gradient effect seems most likely and this can be proven by looking at the countries surrounding Egypt. I’ve focused mainly on the reign of Ramses II because he liked war and as such there is evidence and information of both north and south within one lifetime.
Point 1 The South
Tomb and temple paintings are, in my opinion, the one of the most reliable things we have. These are some of the ones from Beit  el Wali, a temple Ramses II had built. It shows one of his battles against the Nubians, to the south. 

First look, looks like the Nubians and egyptians are depicted of different colour skins but if you notice there are Nubians who are depicted in a different style but in both colours.This of course could be due to lack of different paint colours and the need to highlight individual figures
But then why are more of the figures in the above painting honey coloured when there is no reason to have them stand out from each other. instead look at the clothes. Typically Numidians are depicted with animal skins and the egyptians with the shendyt (linen kilt). There is one woman there who has been painted in the darker tone but with the shendyt this assumes she is Egyptian. So we have at least some evidence that there were dark skinned Egyptian citizens and some lighter skinned Nubian citzensSo at this point, the evidence definitely points to a mixed race country that is darker in the south where the borders are changed through war.Point 2 The North The Hittite empire to the north/east often had contact and conflicts with the Egyptians.The painting below shows Ramses II storming the Hittite fortress of Dapur.(The Shades on the lower image can be disputed as the original fresco has lost all traces of the original paint)However these figures from a later date (created during the reign of Ramses III) show the 5 countries Egypt had most contact/conflict with.
They have been identified as, two different Nubians (possibly different tribes), a Philistine, an Amorite, a Syrian and lastly a Hittite.The Hittite’s (as well as the Amorite and Syrian) skin is shown as pale and as such would probably influence the skin tone to the north east of the Egyptian empire supporting the gradient effect suggested earlier. As a side note the Philistine’s skin is coloured much the same as the Egyptians would colour them selves and their country was between the Hittites and Egyptian empires.Point 3 Political relations and invasionThe practice of political marriage, invasion and other relations means also that there may have been Egyptian Royals that did not fit the ‘honey colour’ because they or (in the marriage case) their mothers did not come from Egypt originally but rather from one of the surrounding countries royal families.Most likely they would have been depicted as honey coloured on the frescos because, like in the first point, Egyptians were portrayed with certain things like the Shendyt and the ruler of Egypt would have most likely been depicted with the height of Egyptian beauty on the wall due to status. However there is the question of Royal family inbreeding (which I will not go indepth) to say that sisters and half sisters as well as cousins would often rise to the throne through marriage. This does not completely disregard the idea of odd skinned royals due to the presence of a Harem system in the palace. 
TL;DR The Egyptian empire was mixed races, probably darker in the south and paler in the north and would have changed dark/light ratio over the years due to border disputes. The royal family would be an outlier on the data of the country due to marriages/breeding/invasion from surrounding countries.Side note: Whenever I say light/ pale I am not talking about Scandinavian/European white but Turkish and Mediterranean skin tone.


I’m not sure about the Roman mummy portrait, though, since it’s, yeah, well, Roman and found in the Faiyum region - a region highly influenced by first Greek/Macedonian and later Roman people and culture from about 332 BCE and onwards. I mean, yes it sort of helps supporting the point that Egypt was a highly mixed society (a point on which I totally agree!!!), but I still don’t think it’s that relevant, when speaking about ancient Egypt and pharaohs, since it’s arguable how “Egyptian” the Faiyum region really was at the time around 100 AD …
But apart from that, I too believe that the ancient Egyptians were highly mixed and that the population of Upper Egypt would probably have differed a bit from that of Lower Egypt due to shifting borders and so on! :-)

plintoon-reblogs:

wardens-oath:

I’m not disputing the Egyptians weren’t white. But unless you can provide me with evidence that they were “pitched black”, then I’m gonna seriously question this post.

For example, this mummy portrait, although being highly Romanised, does not show a black man. It dates from AD100. 

Or, you knnow, we have Nefertiti’s bust. She dates from the Amarna period, Dynasty 18, around the same time as Tutankhamun.

I’m not calling bullshit, I’m just calling this into question.

Also, Ancient Egypt was a mixed society, or did you never learn about The Libyan or Hyksos invasions?

In my grade ten History class we learned that in the North the people were significantly lighter colour than in the south. Making my believe those in the North were probably much more “Arab” looking while the south, since it was closer to Nubia looked like what we consider, “African”.

Also King Tut would’ve had lighter dark skin as did the women in Egypt because they wouldn’t have been working outside in the sun, unlike peasants.

I don’t normally get involved in stuff like this but *cracks knuckles* lets do some research.

The gradient effect seems most likely and this can be proven by looking at the countries surrounding Egypt. I’ve focused mainly on the reign of Ramses II because he liked war and as such there is evidence and information of both north and south within one lifetime.

Point 1 The South

Tomb and temple paintings are, in my opinion, the one of the most reliable things we have. These are some of the ones from Beit  el Wali, a temple Ramses II had built. It shows one of his battles against the Nubians, to the south. 

First look, looks like the Nubians and egyptians are depicted of different colour skins but if you notice there are Nubians who are depicted in a different style but in both colours.
This of course could be due to lack of different paint colours and the need to highlight individual figures

But then why are more of the figures in the above painting honey coloured when there is no reason to have them stand out from each other. instead look at the clothes. Typically Numidians are depicted with animal skins and the egyptians with the shendyt (linen kilt). There is one woman there who has been painted in the darker tone but with the shendyt this assumes she is Egyptian. So we have at least some evidence that there were dark skinned Egyptian citizens and some lighter skinned Nubian citzens

So at this point, the evidence definitely points to a mixed race country that is darker in the south where the borders are changed through war.

Point 2 The North
 
The Hittite empire to the north/east often had contact and conflicts with the Egyptians.
The painting below shows Ramses II storming the Hittite fortress of Dapur.
(The Shades on the lower image can be disputed as the original fresco has lost all traces of the original paint)



However these figures from a later date (created during the reign of Ramses III) show the 5 countries Egypt had most contact/conflict with.

They have been identified as, two different Nubians (possibly different tribes), a Philistine, an Amorite, a Syrian and lastly a Hittite.

The Hittite’s (as well as the Amorite and Syrian) skin is shown as pale and as such would probably influence the skin tone to the north east of the Egyptian empire supporting the gradient effect suggested earlier. 

As a side note the Philistine’s skin is coloured much the same as the Egyptians would colour them selves and their country was between the Hittites and Egyptian empires.

Point 3 Political relations and invasion

The practice of political marriage, invasion and other relations means also that there may have been Egyptian Royals that did not fit the ‘honey colour’ because they or (in the marriage case) their mothers did not come from Egypt originally but rather from one of the surrounding countries royal families.

Most likely they would have been depicted as honey coloured on the frescos because, like in the first point, Egyptians were portrayed with certain things like the Shendyt and the ruler of Egypt would have most likely been depicted with the height of Egyptian beauty on the wall due to status. 

However there is the question of Royal family inbreeding (which I will not go indepth) to say that sisters and half sisters as well as cousins would often rise to the throne through marriage. This does not completely disregard the idea of odd skinned royals due to the presence of a Harem system in the palace. 


TL;DR The Egyptian empire was mixed races, probably darker in the south and paler in the north and would have changed dark/light ratio over the years due to border disputes. The royal family would be an outlier on the data of the country due to marriages/breeding/invasion from surrounding countries.


Side note: Whenever I say light/ pale I am not talking about Scandinavian/European white but Turkish and Mediterranean skin tone.

I’m not sure about the Roman mummy portrait, though, since it’s, yeah, well, Roman and found in the Faiyum region - a region highly influenced by first Greek/Macedonian and later Roman people and culture from about 332 BCE and onwards. I mean, yes it sort of helps supporting the point that Egypt was a highly mixed society (a point on which I totally agree!!!), but I still don’t think it’s that relevant, when speaking about ancient Egypt and pharaohs, since it’s arguable how “Egyptian” the Faiyum region really was at the time around 100 AD …

But apart from that, I too believe that the ancient Egyptians were highly mixed and that the population of Upper Egypt would probably have differed a bit from that of Lower Egypt due to shifting borders and so on! :-)

Amarna Princess
Based on this very pretty bust of a young Amarna princess, perhaps Akhenaten and Nefertiti’s daughter Meritaten.
I hope you like her! :-)

Amarna Princess

Based on this very pretty bust of a young Amarna princess, perhaps Akhenaten and Nefertiti’s daughter Meritaten.

I hope you like her! :-)

Working on an essay about the Amarna letters … God I’m tired of reading about grumpy kings complaining about each other! Luckily though, Luna decided to join me!

Working on an essay about the Amarna letters … God I’m tired of reading about grumpy kings complaining about each other! Luckily though, Luna decided to join me!

Work in progress :3 

Work in progress :3 

A quick watercolour sketch of the false door in the mastaba of vizier Mereruka. 6th Dynasty, Old Kingdom.

A quick watercolour sketch of the false door in the mastaba of vizier Mereruka. 6th Dynasty, Old Kingdom.

morgauseloveshersisters:

Endless list of period movies and tv shows: Agora

This movie is so beautiful to look at! I love period movies with gorgeous costumes, settings and props :3 

A message from savvy-v
what do you think about people on tumblr brining up the whole racial hypothesis thing again?

I assume that you’re referring to all the posts about ancient Egyptians and the ongoing argument about their origins and race??

Well, to be honest, I’m sick and tired of hearing and reading about it. I’m tired of the enormous and continuous flow of misinformation about ancient Egypt and its population that’s being spred all over this site (and many others btw). I’m tired of people altering and/or ignoring historical facts about Egypt in order to make a “strong” argument. I’m tired of people using the same arguments over and over again, without listening to any counterarguments/new discoveries or theories (because those things actually happen, when you’re dealing with history and stuff that no one can be absolutely certain about!) and I’m extremely tired of the whole “I say this, and it is right, because I’m sayning it and you’re wrong” mentality. I mean, you won’t learn anything, if you’re constantly feeling offended by the fact that other people don’t share your opinion all the time!

image

People should start reading real, proper sources about stuff and not just trust everything they read on tumblr/other not very reliable websites.

The Son of Aten

This is definitely one of my favourite drawings so far - I’ve always loved the Amarna Period and Akhenaten is one of my favourite pharaohs!

The Son of Aten

This is definitely one of my favourite drawings so far - I’ve always loved the Amarna Period and Akhenaten is one of my favourite pharaohs!

Sometimes I just don’t get people …

So, I sat on the train on my way home today, reading “The Oxford History of Ancient Egypt”, when this guy came over and sat opposite me. I looked up, smiled politely and then continued reading about the decline of the Old Kingdom. After a couple of minutes, the guy started to giggle. At first, I just ignored it (I assumed he was looking at his phone or something like that) but then he said: “What the hell are you reading?” and I realized that he was talking to me. I looked up, told him that I was reading about ancient Egypt, and quickly returned to my book. He stated giggling again and said: “What the fuck? Why are you reading that? You’re reading about a bunch of dead guys and stones!” After he had said this, I took a deep breath, closed my book very slowly, looked at him, and said: “To be honest, I think the fact that I prefer reading about dead guys and stones over talking to you says a lot more about you than it does about me. Have a nice day” Having said this, I packed my stuff and left (I had to get off at the next stop).

image

 

The Lamentations of Isis
(I just couldn’t resist colouring this drawing!)
I wanted to sort of “experiment” a bit with some different kinds of ancient Egyptian jewellery and clothes - and I really like how both musicians turned out!
I got inspired by Ali Jihad Racy’s beautiful ancient Egyptian themed music - especially this song 
Enjoy! :3

The Lamentations of Isis

(I just couldn’t resist colouring this drawing!)

I wanted to sort of “experiment” a bit with some different kinds of ancient Egyptian jewellery and clothes - and I really like how both musicians turned out!

I got inspired by Ali Jihad Racy’s beautiful ancient Egyptian themed music - especially this song

Enjoy! :3

Taking a break from studying (and listening to some gorgeous ancient Egypt inspired music ) ^^ Hopefully I’ll get time to colour it soon (I hate having unfinished drawings lying around!)
Final drawing

Taking a break from studying (and listening to some gorgeous ancient Egypt inspired music ) ^^ Hopefully I’ll get time to colour it soon (I hate having unfinished drawings lying around!)

Final drawing

Second week at University … Books books books!!! :3

Second week at University … Books books books!!! :3

sandrosanio:

Even the Gods on Earth have to pray
I don’t know if you have noticed but Seti I., father of Ramesses the Great is almost always depicted praying and worshiping and that gave me and idea to draw him and his young and beautiful wife, queen Tuya praying as the new day begins to Amon, patron of the gods.I guess Ramesses and his family are my favorite royal Egyptians! :)(Also, the first idea was to add their children (Ramesses, Tia and Henutmire), in their teens, praying with them, but I gave up on that ide, cause the pic would be to crowded!)Ignor the statue of Amon, I actually used an image for it! :DHope you like it, I surely do! :)

Great work as always, Sanio! :-) (It’s actually kind of funny, I’ve thought about drawing something like this myself for some time now! XD ) 

sandrosanio:

Even the Gods on Earth have to pray

I don’t know if you have noticed but Seti I., father of Ramesses the Great is almost always depicted praying and worshiping and that gave me and idea to draw him and his young and beautiful wife, queen Tuya praying as the new day begins to Amon, patron of the gods.
I guess Ramesses and his family are my favorite royal Egyptians! :)

(Also, the first idea was to add their children (Ramesses, Tia and Henutmire), in their teens, praying with them, but I gave up on that ide, cause the pic would be to crowded!)
Ignor the statue of Amon, I actually used an image for it! :D

Hope you like it, I surely do! :)

Great work as always, Sanio! :-) (It’s actually kind of funny, I’ve thought about drawing something like this myself for some time now! XD ) 

gildedhistory:

Hairstyles of Ancient Rome

"Hairstyle fashion in Rome was ever changing, and particularly in the Roman Imperial Period there were a number of different ways to style hair. Much the same with clothes, there were several hairstyles that were limited to certain people in ancient society. Styles are so distinctive they allow scholars today to create a chronology of Roman portraiture and art; we are able to date pictures of the empresses on coins, or identify busts depending on their hairstyles."

"Busts themselves could have detachable wigs. There have been many suggestions as to why some busts have been created with detachable wigs and some without. Perhaps the main reason was to keep the bust looking up-to-date. It would have been too expensive to commission a new bust every time hair fashion changed, so a mix-and-match bust would have been preferable for women with less money." [X]